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Hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNA accumulation in maize root cells colonized by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus as revealed by in situ hybridization

Summary

To determine whether the expression of cell wall related genes changes during the establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis (AM), we studied the expression of a maize hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) gene. In situ hybridization showed that, in differentiated cells of maize roots, mRNA accumulation corresponding to the gene encoding for HRGP was only found when the cells were colonized by the endomycorrhizal fungusGlomus versiforme.

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Correspondence to R. Balestrini.

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Balestrini, R., Josè-Estanyol, M., Puigdomènech, P. et al. Hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNA accumulation in maize root cells colonized by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus as revealed by in situ hybridization. Protoplasma 198, 36–42 (1997). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01282129

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Keywords

  • Arbuscular mycorrhiza
  • Zea mays
  • Hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein
  • In situ hybridization
  • Glomus versiforme