The role of Cdc25 phosphatases in cell cycle checkpoints

Summary

The major driving forces in the eukaryotic cell cycle are the cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk). Cdks can be activated through dephosphorylation of inhibitory phosphorylations catalyzed by the Cdc25 phosphatase family. In higher-eukaryotic cells, there exist three Cdc25 family members, Cdc25A, Cdc25B, and Cdc25C. While Cdc25A plays a major role at the G1-to-S phase transition, Cdc25B and C are required for entry into mitosis. The regulation of Cdc25C is crucial for the operation of the DNA-damage checkpoint. Two protein kinases, Chk1 and Cds1, can be activated in response to DNA damage or in the presence of unreplicated DNA. Chk1 and Cds1 may phosphorylate Cdc25C to prevent entry into mitosis through inhibition of Cdc2 (Cdk1) dephosphorylation.

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Correspondence to Ingrid Hoffmann.

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Hoffmann, I. The role of Cdc25 phosphatases in cell cycle checkpoints. Protoplasma 211, 8–11 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01279894

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Keywords

  • Cdc25 phosphatase
  • Cell cycle
  • DNA damage
  • Checkpoint
  • Cyclin-dependent kinase
  • Phosphorylation