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Alternative Lifestyles

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 310–356 | Cite as

Cultural determinants of jealousy

  • Ralph B. Hupka
Article

Abstract

I disagree with the practice of defining romantic jealousy in terms of other emotions, on the grounds that it is circular and redundant. Moreover, it appears implausible to me that the variety of private motives for protecting a relationship against an interloper can be accounted for by a unitary source of motivation, such as an emotion of romantic jealousy. I propose that the words romantic jealousy, instead of identifying an emotion of jealousy, refer to the situation characterized by the potential, or actual, loss of a loved one, or a mate, to a real or imagined rival. Reactions in such a situation, whatever they may be, are labeled as jealousy. On the basis of the assumption that individuals create culture to satisfy personal goals and are, in turn, affected by their cultural creations, I identify particular cultural factors as increasing the likelihood that an individual will be threatened by a jealousy event. The individual makes use of culturally sanctioned coping strategies for dealing with the threat. These concepts are discussed in the context of appraisal processes.

Keywords

Coping Strategy Social Policy Social Issue Cultural Factor Personal Goal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sage Publications, Inc. 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph B. Hupka
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversityLong Beach

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