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Air pollution and depressive symptomatology: Exploratory analyses of intervening psychosocial factors

Abstract

Exploratory modelling revealed associations of individual perceptions, social factors, and physical components of air pollution with depressive symptomatology. Residents of the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area who have experienced a recent, undesirable life event and who perceive poor air quality in their neighborhood have greater symptoms of depression. These effects control for socioeconomic status and prior psychological status. In addition we show that perceived air quality is a function of both toxic components of ambient air as well as individual psychosocial experiences.

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Additional information

This research was supported by the National Institute for Mental Health (MH 28924-10A1) and the Southern California Edison Health Effects Research Laboratory (J-1909902). We thank Jean Ospital, Len Edwards, and Julian Foon for their assistance. Reprint requests should be sent to Gary Evans, Program in Social Ecology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92717.

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Jacobs, S.V., Evans, G.W., Catalano, R. et al. Air pollution and depressive symptomatology: Exploratory analyses of intervening psychosocial factors. Popul Environ 7, 260–272 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01256411

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Keywords

  • Socioeconomic Status
  • Metropolitan Area
  • Social Factor
  • Exploratory Analysis
  • Psychosocial Factor