Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 88, Issue 6–7, pp 629–636 | Cite as

Physical mapping of rRNA genes by fluorescent in-situ hybridization and structural analysis of 5S rRNA genes and intergenic spacer sequences in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris)

  • T. Schmidt
  • T. Schwarzacher
  • J. S. Heslop-Harrison
Article

Abstract

A digoxigenin-labelled 5S rDNA probe (pTa-794) and a rhodamine-labelled 18S-5.8S-25S rDNA probe (pTa71) were used for double-target in-situ hybridization to root-tip metaphase, prophase and interphase chromosomes of cultivated beet,Beta vulgaris L. After in-situ hybridization with the 18S-5.8S-25S rDNA probe, one major pair of sites was detected which corresponded to the secondary constriction at the end of the short arm of chromosome 1. The two rDNA chromosomes were often associated and the loci only contracted in late metaphase. In the majority of the metaphase plates analyzed, we found a single additional minor hybridization site with pTa71. One pair of 5S rRNA gene clusters was localized near the centromere on the short arm of one of the three largest chromosomes which does not carry the 18S-5.8S-25S genes. Because of the difficulties in distinguishing the very similarly-sizedB. vulgaris chromosomes in metaphase preparations, the 5S and the 18S-5.8S-25S rRNA genes can be used as markers for chromosome identification. TwoXbaI fragments (pXV1 and pXV2), comprising the 5S ribosomal RNA gene and the adjacent intergenic spacer, were isolated. The two 5S rDNA repeats were 349 bp and 351 bp long, showing considerable sequence variation in the intergenic spacer. The use of fluorescent in-situ hybridization, complemented by molecular data, for gene mapping and for integrating genetic and physical maps of beet species is discussed.

Key words

Beta vulgaris Sugar beet In-situ hybridization rRNA genes Intergenic spacer Physical mapping 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Schmidt
    • 1
  • T. Schwarzacher
    • 1
  • J. S. Heslop-Harrison
    • 1
  1. 1.Karyobiology Group, Department of Cell BiologyJohn Innes CentreNorwichUK

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