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Radiation and Environmental Biophysics

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 141–147 | Cite as

Cyclic AMP response in cells exposed to electric fields of different frequencies and intensities

  • G. Knedlitschek
  • M. Noszvai-Nagy
  • H. Meyer-Waarden
  • J. Schimmelpfeng
  • K. F. Weibezahn
  • H. Dertinger
Article

Abstract

The action on intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) of therapeutically used 4000-Hz electric fields was investigated and compared with 50-Hz data. Cultured mouse fibroblasts were exposed for 5 minutes to 4000-Hz sine wave internal electric fields between 3 mV/m and 30 V/m applied within culture medium. A statistically significant decrease in cellular cAMP concentration relative to unexposed cells was observed for fields higher than 10 mV/m. The drop in cAMP was most pronounced at lower field strengths (71 % of controls at 30 mV/m) and tended to disappear at higher field strengths. An increase of cAMP content was observed with 50-Hz electric fields, as was also the case when 4000-Hz fields were modulated with certain low frequencies.

Keywords

Field Strength Sine Wave Lower Field Mouse Fibroblast cAMP Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Knedlitschek
    • 1
  • M. Noszvai-Nagy
    • 1
  • H. Meyer-Waarden
    • 1
  • J. Schimmelpfeng
    • 1
  • K. F. Weibezahn
    • 1
  • H. Dertinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für ToxikologieKernforschungszentrum KarlsruheKarlsruheGermany

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