Hocus-pocus, the focus isn't strictly on locus: Rotter's social learning theory modified for health

Abstract

This paper shows how the author's original modification of Rotter's social learning theory (SLT) highlighting the construct of health locus of control beliefs is no longer adequate. It develops a new modification of SLT where the internal health locus of control beliefs moderate but do not mediate health-promoting behavior. It discusses the development and utility of global indicators of perceived control over health in preference to a strict focus on the locus of the control.

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Correspondence to Kenneth A. Wallston.

Additional information

The author would like to thank Terry Conway, Robert DeVellis, Grant Marshall, and Tim Smith for their comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript. Although some of the thoughts are theirs, the author accepts all of the blame for misinterpreting their feedback.

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Wallston, K.A. Hocus-pocus, the focus isn't strictly on locus: Rotter's social learning theory modified for health. Cogn Ther Res 16, 183–199 (1992). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01173488

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Key words

  • beliefs
  • control
  • health behavior
  • social learning theory