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African Archaeological Review

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 19–28 | Cite as

Comparison of Gadeb and other Early Stone Age assemblages from Africa south of the Sahara

  • Hiro Kurashina
Article

Abstract

An exploratory multivariate analysis is presented of 64 Early Stone Age tool-assemblages from sub-Saharan Africa. The results generally confirm, but contribute significantly to understanding, the conventional division of these assemblages between Oldowan, Karari, Early Acheulian and Acheulian industrial groupings. The distinction between Oldowan and Developed Oldowan is shown to be less clearly defined.

Keywords

Multivariate Analysis Cultural Study Industrial Grouping Exploratory Multivariate Analysis Conventional Division 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Resumé

L'auteur présente une analyse tentative à plusieurs variables de 64 groupes d'outils de l'Age de la Pierre Ancien en Afrique méridionale. Les résultats confirment en général—mais aussi contribuent considérablement à comprendre—la division conventionnelle de ces ensembles entre les groupements industriels de l'Oldowayen, le Karari, l'Acheuléen ancien et l'Acheuléen. La différence entre l'Oldowayen et l'Oldowayen évolué se montre moins clairement définie.

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Copyright information

© Cambridge University Press 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiro Kurashina

There are no affiliations available

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