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Journal of Applied Electrochemistry

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 75–80 | Cite as

Application of the trickle tower to problems of pollution control. III. Heavy-metal cyanide solutions

  • E. A. El-Ghaoui
  • R. E. W. Jansson
Papers

Abstract

The destruction of CN and co-deposition of copper, cadmium, nickel, zinc and lead, both as simple solutions and as mixtures, have been investigated in a number of trickle towers with from 8 to 49 layers of cells. Specific chemical effects due to the formation of cyano-complexes of some of the metals are evident, and it has been found that copper, nickel and cadmium accelerate the destruction of CN, at least initially. For simple solutions a previously proposed scaling law is adequate.

Keywords

Copper Zinc Physical Chemistry Nickel Cadmium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Nomenclature

a

length of bipolar element (cm)

c

concentration (ppm)

c0

initial concentration (ppm)

K

mass transfer coefficient (cm s−1)

K′=KθL

effective mass transfer coefficient (cm s−1)

L

wetted perimeter per layer of packing (cm)

p

number of layers of cells

t

time (s)

vo

volumetric flow rate (cm3 s−1)

V

inventory of solution (cm3)

θL

fractional active length

φs

reversible potential with respect to main counter reaction (V)

φsT

potential applied across an element with respect to main counter reaction (V)

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References

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall Ltd. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. El-Ghaoui
    • 1
  • R. E. W. Jansson
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemistry DepartmentSouthampton UniversitySouthamptonUK

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