Experience-dependent neuropsychological recovery and the treatment of chronic alcoholism

Abstract

This paper reviews the relationship between cognitive status and treatment outcome in chronic alcoholics, the natural history of recovery, and the role of cognitively oriented remediation programs in facilitating recovery. Seven studies of experience-dependent recovery are described in which behavioral improvement was noted. Various recommendations for treatment over the course of recovery are made, guided by anticipated changes in capacity to process complex information over time.

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Goldman, M.S. Experience-dependent neuropsychological recovery and the treatment of chronic alcoholism. Neuropsychol Rev 1, 75–101 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01108859

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Key words

  • neuropsychological recovery
  • alcoholism treatment
  • rehabilitation