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The influence of milling on the nutritive value of flour from cereal grains. 4. Rice

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Abstract

Brown and milled rices were prepared from rough rice, and the nutritive value of the rices was studied by chemical analyses and in balance experiments with growing rats. The concentration of essential nutrients decreased with the degree of milling, but the energy density of brown and milled rices was similar. In the highly refined white rice the protein content was reduced to 86% and the mineral content to 23% of corresponding levels in brown rice. The zinc concentration was halved. The amino acid composition was rather unaffected by the degree of milling, but the lysine concentration was slightly lower in white rice than in brown rice. Milling was accompanied by an increase in true protein digestibility and a corresponding decrease in biological value. Thus net protein utilization of the different rices was remarkably uniform. A total of 33% of the utilizable protein and 22% of the digestible energy in brown rice was removed during milling.

Rats fed rough, brown and lightly milled rices were unable to maintain their femur zinc concentration; deposition of calcium and phosphorus also appeared to be affected. Factors present in the outer part of the rice kernel interfere strongly with zinc utilization. Phytate and/or fibre are not solely responsible for this effect. Unless rice was milled into highly refined white rice, zinc status of rats was adversely affected. The results suggest that zinc might be a limiting factor in rice-based diets.

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Pedersen, B., Eggum, B.O. The influence of milling on the nutritive value of flour from cereal grains. 4. Rice. Plant Food Hum Nutr 33, 267–278 (1983). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01094752

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01094752

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