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Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 127–131 | Cite as

Influence of competition, irrigation levels and nitrogen fertilization on protein content and protein yield of three spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars

  • B. R. Rajeswara Rao
  • Rajendra Prasad
Article

Abstract

Protein content and protein yield of three spring wheat cultivars differing in morphological and physiological growth characters were found to be influenced by intercultivar competition, irrigation levels and nitrogen fertilization. The protein content of the tall cultivar C 306 and the protein yield of the dwarf cultivar HD 2160 were more than the other cultivars. Binary mixed stands were not superior to the better component cultivar. Intercultivar competition increased the protein content of dwarf and semi-dwarf cultivars, but decreased the protein content of tall cultivar. On the other hand, protein yield of the dwarf cultivar decreased and that of tall cultivar increased when grown in mixed stands. Protein yield of semi-dwarf cultivar increased when grown with dwarf cultivar, but decreased when grown with tall cultivar. Two or three irrigations increased the protein content and protein yield of all the three cultivars and their mixed stands over one irrigation. Protein content and protein yield of the cultivars and their mixed stands were higher when 150 kg N/ha was applied than when 80 kg N/ha was applied.

Key words

wheat cultivars nitrogen fertilization irrigation protein yield content 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. R. Rajeswara Rao
    • 1
  • Rajendra Prasad
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of AgronomyIndian Agricultural Research InstituteNew DelhiIndia

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