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Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 45, Issue 1, pp 1–9 | Cite as

Chemical composition of purslane (Portulaca oleracea)

  • Ali I. Mohamed
  • Ahmed S. Hussein
Article

Abstract

Purslane (Portulaca oleracea), grown under greenhouse conditions, was harvested at three growth stages and analyzed for total solids, total protein, ash, soluble carbohydrate, and fructose/fructane in whole plants, leaves, stems, and roots. Significant increases were observed in total solids and protein during plant maturation. Leaves had the highest amount of protein in the third growth stage (44.25g/100g dry matter). Roots showed a decline in protein level as the plant aged. Soluble carbohydrate was significantly higher in growth states 1 and 3. Significant variation among growth stages was found with regard to total phosphorous, calcium, potassium, iron, managanese, and copper. Total phosphorus (P) content in leaves was significantly higher than P found in stems and roots. Iron (Fe) content varied significantly among growth stages, and roots and leaves had the highest Fe content (121.47 and 33.21 mg, respectively). Significant accumulation of managanese (Mn) was found in different growth stages. Leaves and roots had significantly higher Mn content than stems.

Key words

Purslane (Portulaca oleracaeGrowth stages Protein Ash Carbohydrates Minerals 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ali I. Mohamed
    • 1
  • Ahmed S. Hussein
    • 2
  1. 1.Agricultural Research StationVirginia State UniversityPetersburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of Natural SciencesUniversity of Maryland Eastern ShorePrincess AnneUSA

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