Skip to main content
Log in

A developmental-genetic analysis of aggressive behavior in mice. II. Cross-sex inheritance

  • Published:
Behavior Genetics Aims and scope Submit manuscript

Abstract

Differences in aggression produced by selective breeding for differential aggressiveness among male mice are also inherited by females: the expression of these differences in female mice depends on the conditions of assessment. In the standard opponents tests after isolation housing, consistent line differentiation was clear in males to the S 8 generation, but no aggressive behavior occurred at all in female tests. In contrast, in postpartum tests and in repeated intruder trials over the life span of group-reared animals, females from the line of high-aggressive males were more aggressive than females from the line of low-aggressive males. These findings indicate that the genetic pathways that mediate aggressive behavior in male and female mice are not entirely independent.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this article

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or Ebook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Price excludes VAT (USA)
Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.

Instant access to the full article PDF.

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • Cairns, R. B., and Nakelski, J. S. (1971). On fighting in mice: Ontogenetic and experiential determinants.J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. 74:354–364.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cairns, R. B., MacCombie, D. J., and Hood, K. E. (1983). A developmental-genetic analysis of aggressive behavior in mice. I. Behavioral outcomes.J. Comp. Psychol. 97:69–89.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cairns, R. B., Hood, K. E., and Midlam, J. (1985). On fighting in mice: Is there a sensitive period for isolation effects?Anim. Behav. 33:166–180.

    Google Scholar 

  • Calhoun, J. B. (1962).The Ecology and Sociology of the Norway Rat, Public Health Service Publication No. 1008, Bethesda, Md.

  • DeBold, J. F., and Miczek, K. A. (1984). Aggression persists after ovariectomy in female rats.Hormones Behav. 18:177–190.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ebert, P. D., and Hyde, J. S. (1976). Selection for agonistic behavior in wild femaleMus musculus.Behav. Genet. 6:291–304.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fuller, J. L., and Thompson, W. R. (1978).Foundations of Behavior Genetics, Mosby, St. Louis, Mo.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gariépy, J.-L., Hood, K. E., and Cairns, R. B. (1988). A developmental-genetic analysis of aggressive behavior in mice. III. Behavioral mediation by heightened reactivity or immobility?Journal of Comparative Psychology (in press).

  • Hood, K. E. (1981). Aggression among female rats during the estrus cycle. In Flanelly, K. J., Blanchard, D. C., and Blanchard, R. J. (eds.),Biological Perspectives on Aggression, Alan Liss, New York.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hood, K. E. and Cairns, R. B. (1988). A developmental-genetic analysis of aggressive behavior in mice. IV. Genotype-environment interaction.Aggressive Behavior (in press).

  • Hyde, J. S., and Ebert, P. D. (1976). Correlated response in selection for aggressiveness in female mice. I. Male aggressiveness.Behav. Genet. 6:421–428.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hyde, J. S., and Sawyer, T. F. (1979). Correlated characters in selection for aggressiveness in female mice. II. Maternal aggressiveness.Behav. Genet. 9:571–578.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hyde, J. S., and Sawyer, T. F. (1980). Selection for agonistic behavior in wild female mice.Behav. Genet. 10:349–360.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lagerspetz, K. M. J., and Lagerspetz, K. Y. H. (1971). Changes in the aggressiveness of mice resulting from selective breeding, learning, and social isolation.Scand. J. Psychol. 12:241–248.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lagerspetz, K. M. J., and Lagerspetz, K. Y. H. (1975). The expression of the genes of aggressiveness in mice: The effect of androgen on aggression and sexual behavior in females.Aggress. Behav. 1:291–296.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rouyer, F., Simmler, M.-C., Johnsson, C., Vergnaud, G., Cooke, H. J., and Weissenbach, J. (1986). A gradient of sex linkage in the pseudoautosomal region of the human sex chromosomes.Nature 319:291–295.

    Google Scholar 

  • Scott, J. P. (1977). Social genetics.Behav. Genet. 7:327–346.

    Google Scholar 

  • Selmanoff, M. K., Jumonville, J. E., Maxson, S. C., and Ginsburg, B. E. (1975). Evidence for a Y-chromosomal contribution to an aggressive phenotype in inbred mice.Nature 253:529–530.

    Google Scholar 

  • Selmanoff, M. K., Goldman, B. D., Maxson, S. C., and Ginsburg, B. E. (1977). Correlated effects of the Y-chromosome of mice on developmental changes in testosterone levels and intermale aggression.Life Sci. 20:359–366.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shrenker, P., and Maxson, S. C. (1982). The Y chromosomes of DBA/1 Bg and DBA/2 Bg compared for effects on intermale aggression.Behav. Genet. 12:429–434.

    Google Scholar 

  • St. John, R. D. (1973). Genetic analysis of tail-rattling in the mouse.Nature 241:549–551.

    Google Scholar 

  • St. John, R. D., and Corning, P. A. (1973). Maternal aggression in mice.Behav. Biol. 9:635–639.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vale, J. R., Ray, D., and Vale, C. A. (1972). The interaction of genotype and exogenous neonatal androgen: Agonistic behavior in female mice.Behav. Biol. 7:321–334.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van Oortmerssen, G. A., and Bakker, T. C. M. (1981). Artificial selection for short and long attack latencies in wildMus musculus domesticus.Behav. Genet. 11:115–126.

    Google Scholar 

  • Whitsett, J. M., and Miller, L. (1985). Reproductive development in male deer mice exposed to aggressive behavior.Dev. Psychobiol. 18:287–290.

    Google Scholar 

  • Yasukawa, N. J., Monder, H., Leff, F. K., and Christian, J. J. (1985). Role of female behavior in controlling population growth in mice.Aggress. Behav. 11:49–64.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Additional information

This research was supported by NICHD Grants F32-HD06348 and R01 HD14648

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Hood, K.E., Cairns, R.B. A developmental-genetic analysis of aggressive behavior in mice. II. Cross-sex inheritance. Behav Genet 18, 605–619 (1988). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01082312

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01082312

Key Words

Navigation