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Pharmacokinetic evaluation of hemodialysis in acute drug overdose

Abstract

The contribution of hemodialysis to the removal of drugs in the overdosed patient continues to be questioned. Often the value of hemodialysis is judged on qualitative rather than quantitative information. The latter information can be obtained by applying pharmacokinetic principles. The primary pharmacokinetic parameters required to evaluate drug removal by hemodialysis are (1) apparent volume of distribution, (2) dialysis clearance, and (3) total body clearance. Eighteen drugs commonly encountered in the overdose setting are evaluated using this approach.

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This work was supported in part by Grant 16496 from the National Intitutes of Health.

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Takki, S., Gambertoglio, J.G., Honda, D.H. et al. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of hemodialysis in acute drug overdose. Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Biopharmaceutics 6, 427–442 (1978). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01062724

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Key words

  • drug overdose
  • hemodialysis
  • pharmacokinetic evaluation
  • dialyzability