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Structural identifiability of “first-pass” models

  • Alain Venot
  • Eric Walter
  • Yves Lecourtier
  • Atilla Raksanyi
  • Laurence Chauvelot-Moachon
Article

Abstract

This paper considers the structural identifiability of two compartmental models classically used to describe the pharmacokinetics of drugs orally administered and transformed into a metabolite with a firstpass effect at the hepatic level. The simplest model proves not to be globally identifiable even when plasma and urinary measurements of the drug and metabolite concentrations are made. It admits two sets of admissible solutions, so that a prioriknowledge must be introduced to distinguish them. The more complex model appears globally identifiable when blood and urine measurements are made.

Key words

First-pass effect structural identifiability compartmental models 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alain Venot
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eric Walter
    • 3
  • Yves Lecourtier
    • 3
  • Atilla Raksanyi
    • 3
  • Laurence Chauvelot-Moachon
    • 4
  1. 1.Institut de Recherches Thérapeutique et Pharmacologique CliniquesHôpital CochinParisFrance
  2. 2.INSERM U194ParisFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire des Signaux et SystèmesCNRS, Ecole Supérieure d'ElectricitéGif-sur-YvetteFrance
  4. 4.Laboratoire de PharmacologieHôpital CochinParisFrance

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