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Critical levels for soil pH, available P, K, Zn and Mn and maize ear-leaf content of P, Cu and Mn in sedimentary soils of South-Western Nigeria

Abstract

In the sedimentary soils of South-western Nigeria, actual and expected relative yields of maize were plotted against soil physical factors, soil avalilable nutrients and ear-leaf content of maize. These were used to set critical ranges of these factors for optimum production. Regression equations were obtained for each of the soil and plant factors for predicting yield, thereby making possible yield prediction with levels of each of these factors in these soils if all other factors are constant.

The critical range concept combined with the soil physical and chemical properties and plant nutrient content could be a useful diagnostic tool for soil ammendment in crop production. Critical ranges were set as follows:

pH, 6–6.5; available P (Bray's Pl), 10–16 mg Kg−1; Exchangeable K, 0.6–0.8 me K100g−1; available Zn, 5–10mg kg−1; available Mn, about 25 mg Kg−1; Ear-leaf P, 2.5–3.0%; Ear-leaf Cu, 10–20 mg Kg−1; Earleaf Mn, about 50 mg Kg−1.

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Adeoye, G.O., Agboola, A.A. Critical levels for soil pH, available P, K, Zn and Mn and maize ear-leaf content of P, Cu and Mn in sedimentary soils of South-Western Nigeria. Fertilizer Research 6, 65–71 (1985). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01058165

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Key words

  • Sedimentary soils
  • Actual and expected relative yields
  • ear-leaf content
  • relative yield
  • critical range