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Human behavior in fires—a review of research in the United Kingdom

Abstract

In recent years research into human behavior in fires has been carried out in several countries for improving provisions for life safety currently prescribed in firesafety codes. This technical note reviews briefly the findings of human behavior studies in the United Kingdom with particular reference to buildings with a large number of people at risk. According to one of the main conclusions of this paper, for successful evacuation, early detection should be followed by timely and convincing communication to building occupants information about the existence, location, and spread of fire. This can be achieved by computer-based informative fire warning systems, which is the subject matter of another technical note.

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Ramachandran, G. Human behavior in fires—a review of research in the United Kingdom. Fire Technol 26, 149–155 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01040179

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Key words

  • fires
  • life safety
  • codes
  • large buildings
  • human behavior
  • evacuation