Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 197–204 | Cite as

Developments in the biomedical evaluation of silicone rubber

  • R. van Noort
  • M. M. Black
  • B. Harris
Papers

Abstract

Passive prosthetic devices, for example artificial heart valves, can be manufactured from elastomeric materials such as silicone rubber. This paper describes how optimum properties for a medical grade heat-vulcanizing silicone rubber can be best achieved. The paper will also describe how the properties of these materials are affected by the different cleaning and sterilization procedures which may be used. Thein vivo response of this silicone rubber to subcutaneous implantation in guinea pigs has been investigated for periods of up to ten months. Scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces of these elastomers has been performed. As a result, it has been possible to perform detailed examinations of the topological features of the surfaces prior to and after implantation.

Keywords

Polymer Silicone Electron Microscopy Scan Electron Microscopy Rubber 

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall Ltd. 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. van Noort
    • 1
  • M. M. Black
    • 1
  • B. Harris
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medical PhysicsUniversity of SheffieldUK
  2. 2.Department of Materials ScienceUniversity of BathUK

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