Reading and Writing

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 113–139 | Cite as

Word recognition: The interface of educational policies and scientific research

  • Marilyn J. Adams
  • Maggie Bruck
Article

Abstract

As a result of a tremendous amount of research in educational, cognitive and developmental psychology on the nature and acquisition of reading skills, practitioners have a goldmine of evidence upon which to design effective educational programs for beginning and problem readers. This evidence is highly consistent in terms of delineating different stages of reading that young children pass through, the types of skills that they are to acquire, and the sorts of difficulties that they are likely to encounter. The purpose of this paper is to broadly outline current knowledge of the beginning stages of reading acquisition for both normal and problem readers and to relate this knowledge to current language arts curricular practices in North America.

Key words

Comprehension Connectionist Emergent literacy Phonemic awareness Phonics Reading disability Reading instruction Whole language Word recognition 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilyn J. Adams
    • 1
  • Maggie Bruck
    • 2
  1. 1.Bolt Beranek & Newman Inc., Systems and TechnologiesCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.McGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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