Reading and Writing

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 251–278 | Cite as

Promoting phonemic analysis ability among kindergartners

Effects of different training programs
  • Luz Cary
  • Arlette Verhaeghe
Article

Abstract

Two longitudinal studies following the design used by Lundberg et al's (1988) aimed at examining the effects of different metaphonological training programs on phonemic analysis ability acquisition among kindergartners (mean age: 5 years 5 months in both studies). In Study 1, two training programs involving either rhymes, syllables and phonemes, or rhymes and syllables only, were administered to different groups. Progress in phonemic analysis ability was exclusively observed in the group whose training included phonemes. An untrained control group displayed no progress in metaphonological ability. In Study 2, two training programs involving either phonemes or syllables were administered to different groups. A third group was trained on non-linguistic visual analysis. Specific effects of training on phonemic analysis ability were disclosed again. While a phoneme-to-supraphoneme generalization was found among the group trained with phonemes, the reverse did not happen among the group trained with syllables. These results support the idea that processes involved in syllabic analysis of speech or in rhyme manipulation cannot be applied to its phonemic structure. In addition, training with non-linguistic visual analysis did not entail any progress in metaphonological ability, thus providing evidence that phonological awareness cannot be promoted by analysis abilities acquired in another domain.

Key words

Phonemic analysis ability Phonemic-vs-supraphonemic training effects Prereaders 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luz Cary
    • 1
  • Arlette Verhaeghe
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculdade de Psicologia e de Ciências da EducaçãoUniversidade de Lisboa, Alameda da UniversidadeLisboaPortugal

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