Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 11, Issue 7, pp 461–466 | Cite as

Cloning and expression ofClostridium stercorarium cellulase genes inEscherichia coli

  • Wolfgang H. Schwarz
  • Sigrid Jauris
  • Monika Kouba
  • Karin Bronnenmeier
  • Walter L. Staudenbauer
Article

Summary

A genomic library of the cellulolytic thermophileClostridium stercorarium NCIB 11745 was constructed inEscherichia coli using the cosmid vector pHC79. Recombinant clones expressing cellulase components were identified by screening for hydrolysis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-cellobioside, and 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-glucoside. Analysis of substrate specificity and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed three groups of clones carrying genes for an endo-β-1,4-glucanase (celZ), a β-cellobiosidase (celX), and a β-glucosidase (bglZ), respectively. All three enzymes were capable of degrading cellodextrins. Furthermore, thecelZ gene product was active on microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel), while thebglZ β-glucosidase showed cellobiase activity.

Keywords

Cellulose Hydrolysis Cellulase Substrate Specificity Bioorganic Chemistry 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang H. Schwarz
    • 1
  • Sigrid Jauris
    • 1
  • Monika Kouba
    • 1
  • Karin Bronnenmeier
    • 1
  • Walter L. Staudenbauer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for MicrobiologyTechnical University MunichMünchen 2Germany

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