Journal of Applied Electrochemistry

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 329–339 | Cite as

Selectivity characteristics of the electrohydrodimerization of acrylonitrile

  • K. Scott
  • I. F. McConvey
  • J. Henderson
Papers

Abstract

A mathematical model of a reaction scheme for the electrohydrodymerization of acrylonitrile to adiponitrile in a loop reactor is presented. This model, which is based on a plug flow reactor with a recycle loop and continuous removal of product, is used to simulate steady-state operation at various operating conditions. The effect of flowrate, current density and mass transport are investigated in terms of their effect on product distributions and selectivity. Overall, the reaction model deals with the formation of five products from the cathodic reactions.

Keywords

Physical Chemistry Mathematical Model Mass Transport Reaction Model Acrylonitrile 

Nomenclature

Cj

bulk concentratio of species j (mol m−3)

Cjs

surface concentration of species j (mol m−3)

Cjo

initial concentration of species j (mol m−3)

Cjp

cell exit concentration of species j (mol m−3)

F

Faraday constant

ik

current density of reaction step k (A m−2)

iT

total applied current density (A m−2)

iAN

current density for acrylonitrile reduction (A m−2)

KL

mass transfer coefficient (m s−1)

ki

rate constant of step i

nk

number of electrons transferred in step k

Nj

number of mols of species j (mol)

S

selectivity

Q

electrolyte flow rate (m3 s−1)

V

cell volume (m3)

XA

conversion

YD

yield of adiponitrile

τ

residence time (s)

σ

electrode area (m2)

Re

Reynolds number based on hydraulic mean diameter

Subscripts

A

acrylonitrile

P

propionitrile

T

trimer

BCN

biscyanoethylether

HOPN

hydroxypropionitrile

O

cell inlet condition

P

cell outlet condition

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    A. N. Haines, I. F. McConvey and K. Scott,Electrochim. Acta 30 (1985) 291.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Y. Arad, M. Levy, I. R. Miller and D. Vofsi,J. Electrochem. Soc. 114 (1967) 899.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    A. R. Wright, Soc. of Chem. Ind. Meeting, ‘Mathematical Modelling of Electrochemical Processes’, London, 3 Feb, 1984.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    D. E. Danly and C. R. Campbell, ‘Technique of Electroorganic Synthesis’, Part III Scale-up and Engineering Aspects (edited by N. L. Weinberg and B. V. Tilak) John Wiley and Sons, New York (1982).Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    W. V. Childs and H. C. Walters, ‘Electro-organic Synthesis Technology’, AIChE Symp. Series No. 185, Vol. 75 (1979) p. 19–25.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    G. M. Mamoor, ‘Mass Transfer Studies in Plate and Frame Electrochemical Reactors’, PhD Thesis, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK (1983).Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    A. N. Haines, unpublished work.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    J. Henderson, I. F. McConvey and K. Scott, I. Chem. E. Annual Research Meeting, Bradford, 14–15 April 1986. I.Chem.E. Symposium Series No. 98.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall Ltd. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Scott
    • 1
  • I. F. McConvey
    • 1
  • J. Henderson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringTeesside PolytechnicMiddlesbroughUK

Personalised recommendations