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What is in a name: The impact of job titles on job evaluation results

Abstract

The effect of job title status on job evaluation ratings was examined. Eighty-six personnel management students used the Factor Evaluation System (FES) to evaluate two job descriptions. One of three different forms of a secretary and accountant job description, differing only on the status of the job title, was randomly assigned to the subjects. The results showed that job title status significantly influenced job evaluation ratings for both the accounting and secretarial jobs. The implications of these findings are discussed and recommendations are made to avoid the contamination of job evaluation results by job title status.

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Correspondence to Jeffrey S. Hornsby.

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Smith, B.N., Hornsby, J.S., Benson, P.G. et al. What is in a name: The impact of job titles on job evaluation results. J Bus Psychol 3, 341–351 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01023051

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Keywords

  • Social Psychology
  • Evaluation System
  • Evaluation Result
  • Social Issue
  • Factor Evaluation