Influence of adrenergic β-receptor activity on blood flow and free fatty acid release in canine subcutaneous adipose tissue during hemorrhagic shock

  • Arisztid G. B. Kovách
  • Sune Rosell
  • Péter Sándor
  • Edith Koltay
  • Margit Hámori
  • Emma Kovách
Article

Summary

Irreversible hemorrhagic shock was produced in dogs by means of a standardized bleeding procedure. Blood flow and net release of free fatty acids were measured in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Infusion of isoprenaline (0.5 μg/kg/ min i.v.) prevented the severe vasoconstriction during bleeding and promoted the net release of free fatty acids. Futhermore, isoprenaline infusion made it possible to restore a normal blood flow after reinfusion of the shed blood in contrast to the case in control animals. Propranolol (1 mg/kg i.v.) decreased the arterial free fatty acid concentration in the resting animal and also increased the mortality rate.

It is concluded thatβ-receptor stimulation by isoprenaline prevents the vascular damage in canine subcutaneous adipose tissue during development of hemorrhagic shock.

Key-words

Hemorrhage Isoprenaline Propranolol Shock Adipose Tissue Blood Flow Fatty Acids 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arisztid G. B. Kovách
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sune Rosell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Péter Sándor
    • 1
    • 2
  • Edith Koltay
    • 1
    • 2
  • Margit Hámori
    • 1
    • 2
  • Emma Kovách
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Experimental Research DepartmentUniversity Semmelweis Medical SchoolBudapestHungary
  2. 2.The Department of PharmacologyKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden

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