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Journal of gambling behavior

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 79–88 | Cite as

Toward a synoptic model of gambling behavior

  • Vicki Abt
  • Martin C. McGurrin
  • James F. Smith
Articles

Abstract

Most social science explanations emphasize idiosyncratic or psychopathological motivation for gambling behavior. These explanations understate the fundamental significance of conventional social structural and cultural factors in determining the meaning and outcome of human social behavior such as gambling. They also neglect the gradual process by which the individual is socialized into the gambling subculture with its roles, norms, and values and the process by which subculture is internalized eventually as cognitive rules which distinguish the gambler from the nongambler. The synoptic model presented in this paper proposes a process by which gamblers continuously compare their gambling behavior with the cognitive rules with which they define gambling. The degree of consonance gamblers perceive between their own gambling behavior and their cognitive image of the standard gambler determines the gambler's behavior in subsequent gambling events.

Keywords

Social Science Social Behavior Cultural Factor Gambling Behavior Science Explanation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vicki Abt
    • 1
  • Martin C. McGurrin
    • 1
  • James F. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.The Pennsylvania State University, The Ogontz CampusAbington

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