Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 1023–1033 | Cite as

Composition and role of volatile substances in atmosphere surrounding two gregarious locusts,Locusta migratoria andSchistocerca gregaria

  • S. Fuzeau-Braesch
  • E. Genin
  • R. Jullien
  • E. Knowles
  • C. Papin
Article

Abstract

Volatile substances in the atmosphere surrounding gregarious locustsSchistocerca gregaria andLocusta migratoria were captured and investigated by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Three aromatic derivates have been identified: phenol, guaiacol, and veratrole. Their relative percentages differ for different ages and species. Behavioral tests show that essentially phenol, guaiacol, and the mixture of the three products tend to increase the aggregation behavior in both species and thus act as “cohesion pheromones.”

Key words

Locusts Orthoptera Locustidae Schistocerca gregaria Locusta migratoria pheromones phenol guaiacol veratrole aggregation gregarious locusts 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Fuzeau-Braesch
    • 1
  • E. Genin
    • 2
  • R. Jullien
    • 2
  • E. Knowles
    • 2
  • C. Papin
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Biologie de l'InsecteUniversité de Paris SudOrsayFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Chimie Structurale OrganiqueUniversité de Paris SudOrsayFrance

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