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Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 289–293 | Cite as

Rates of pathological gambling in publicly funded outpatient substance abuse treatment

  • Joseph W. Ciarrocchi
Brief Report

Abstract

Rates of problem or probable pathological gambling were assessed in substance abusers seeking outpatient treatment in a publicly funded outpatient substance abuse treatment program. The South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS) was administered to 467 consecutive admissions at three different sites. Problem gamblers comprised 6.2 percent of the total (n=29), and 4.5 percent scored as probable pathological gamblers (n=21). These rates are two and one-half times greater than would be expected according to a recent state survey using the SOGS. Implications for assessment and treatment of problem gambling are discussed.

Keywords

Substance Abuse Treatment Program Substance Abuser Problem Gambler Pathological Gambling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph W. Ciarrocchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Pastoral Counseling DepartmentLoyola CollegeColumbia

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