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Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 45–71 | Cite as

Behavior of particulates in thermal plasma flows

  • Y. P. Chyou
  • E. Pfender
Article

Abstract

Injection of particulate matter into a thermal plasma represents one of the approaches used in thermal plasma processing. The injected particles are usually treated as a dispersed phase, governed by the equation of motion and the rate equations for heat and mass transfer in Lagrangian coordinates. A stochastic approach is introduced to take particle dispersion into account due to turbulent fluctuations by randomly sampling instantaneous flow fields. Three-dimensional effects are also considered which are mainly due to particle injection and the presence of a swirl component. A modified approach for investigating noncontinuum effects on plasma-particle heat transfer is proposed, incorporating both electric and aerodynamic effects on the boundary layer around a particle immersed into a thermal plasma. Comparisons of theoretical predictions based on the present model with available experimental data are, in general, in reasonable agreement.

Key Words

Thermal plasma flows particulates three-dimensional effects swirl component modeling 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. P. Chyou
    • 1
  • E. Pfender
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolis

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