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Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 169–184 | Cite as

Perceived family history of problem gambling and scores on SOGS

  • Blase Gambino
  • Robin Fitzgerald
  • Howard Shaffer
  • John Renner
  • Peter Courtnage
Articles

Abstract

A sample of 93 veterans (92.4% males), with a median age of 41, (Mean=43.5) attending clinics for problem drinking, drug abuse and other mental disorders was screened for problems associated with the diagnosis of pathological gambling. The diagnostic instrument employed was the South Oaks Gambling Screen developed by Lesieur and Blume. The data replicate earlier findings indicating a link between parental problem gambling and pathological gambling. The results extended this association to include grandparents thus firming the familial relationship. Several epidemiological measures were defined and illustrated. These included relative risk, the odds ratio, attributable risk percent and population attributable risk percent. The data were consistent with previous research that substance abusers are about six times as likely to be addicted to gambling as the general population.

Keywords

General Population Family History Relative Risk Mental Disorder Drug Abuse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Blase Gambino
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robin Fitzgerald
    • 1
    • 2
  • Howard Shaffer
    • 1
    • 2
  • John Renner
    • 3
  • Peter Courtnage
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryNorman E. Zinberg Center for Addiction Studies Harvard Medical SchoolCambridge
  2. 2.The Cambridge HospitalUSA
  3. 3.VA Medical CenterUSA

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