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Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp 181–199 | Cite as

Perceptions by treatment staff of critical tasks in the treatment of the compulsive gambler

  • Thomas N. Cummings
  • Blase Gambino
Articles
  • 27 Downloads

Abstract

Seventy-five clinicians who treat compulsive gamblers were surveyed. Each rated 89 clinical tasks and responsibilities for importance in the treatment of this population. Analysis of those items for which a plurality of clinicians rated the item as critical was chosen as the criteria of importance. A principal components analysis was conducted to determine the underlying structure of clinical perceptions of importance. An eight-dimensional model was found to describe perceptions in the most satisfactory way. The analysis revealed five major and three minor clusters of tasks and responsibilities. The major dimensions were labeled as (1) self-help/social support, (2) crisis interventions, (3) behavioral resources for change, (4) psychodynamics of treatment, and (5) crisis severity. The minor dimensions were (6) knowledge and training, (7) ethics and sensitivity to needs, and (8) confidentiality and regulations. A brief discussion of the implications are presented.

Keywords

Principal Component Analysis Underlying Structure Major Dimension Critical Task Crisis Intervention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas N. Cummings
    • 1
  • Blase Gambino
    • 2
  1. 1.Massachusetts Council on Compulsive GamblingBoston
  2. 2.Harvard Medical SchoolUSA

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