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The Histochemical Journal

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 655–664 | Cite as

Histochemical study of Hurler's disease by the use of peroxidase-labelled lectins

  • T. Faraggiana
  • S. Shen
  • C. Childs
  • L. Strauss
  • J. Churg
Papers

Summary

Peroxidase-labelled lectins specific for various carbohydrate residues were used as histochemical reagents in the investigation of Hurler's syndrome. Peanut lectin was used to detect terminald-galactose, wheatgerm lectin forN-acetyl-d-glucosamine, soybean lectin forN-acetyl-d-galactosamine,Tetragonolobus lotus lectin for α-l-fucose andBandeiraea S. lectin for α-d-galactose. It was found that Kupffer cells in the liver and splenic reticulo-endothelial cells contain acid mucopolysaccharides which bind lectins in paraffin sections after appropriate fixation. The pattern of lectin binding suggests that such cells contain significant amounts ofd-galactose,l-fucose,N-acetyl-d-galactosamine andN-acetyl-d-glucosamine. It is likely that the last named carbohydrate is present as a polymer. Neurones contain a different carbohydrate, rich in galactose and fucose but poor inN-acetyl-d-glucosamine. This compound is resistant to lipid extraction. Hepatocytes, as a rule, do not react with lectins, most likely because of loss of the more soluble mucopolysaccharides during fixation. The results are consistent with the biochemical data of Hurler's syndrome and indicate that lectins can be a useful tool for the investigation of the cytochemistry of storage disorders.

Keywords

Carbohydrate Galactose Lipid Extraction Kupffer Cell Fucose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall Ltd. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Faraggiana
    • 1
  • S. Shen
    • 1
  • C. Childs
    • 1
  • L. Strauss
    • 1
  • J. Churg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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