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Generation and detection of tunable ultrashort infrared and far-infrared radiation pulses of high intensity

  • P. T. Lang
  • W. J. Knott
  • I. Leipold
  • K. F. Renk
  • A. D. Semenov
  • G. N. Gol'tsman
Article
  • 22 Downloads

Abstract

We report on generation and detection of intense pulsed radiation with frequency tunability in the infrared and far-infrared spectral regions. Infrared radiation is generated with a transversally electrically excited high pressure CO2 laser. A laser pulse of a total duration of about 300 ns consisted, due to self mode locking, of a series of single pulses, some with pulse durations of less than 450 ps and peak powers larger than 20 MW. Using these pulses for optical pumping of a Raman D2O laser, trains of short far-infrared pulses with durations less than 400 ps were obtained. For detection a new ultrafast superconducting detector was used.

Key words

High pressure CO2 laser mode locking stimulated Raman scattering detection of radiation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. T. Lang
    • 1
  • W. J. Knott
    • 1
  • I. Leipold
    • 1
  • K. F. Renk
    • 1
  • A. D. Semenov
    • 2
  • G. N. Gol'tsman
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für Angewandte PhysikUniversität RegensburgRegensburgGermany
  2. 2.Physics DepartmentState Pedagogical UniversityMoscowUSSR

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