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Hydrogen production from glucose by immobilized growing cells ofClostridium butyricum

  • Isao Karube
  • Naoto Urano
  • Tadashi Matsunaga
  • Shuichi Suzuki
Biotechnology

Summary

Clostridium butyricum was immobilized in a porous carrier (acetylcellulose filter) with agar. Addition of peptone to the reaction mixture increased the hydrogen productivity from glucose. The number of cells in the agaracetylcellulose increased during incubation in the medium containing glucose and peptone, and the immobilized growing cells converted 45% of the glucose to hydrogen. Riboflavin enhanced the hydrogen productivity and the lactate produced by the native cells decreased remarkably. Therefore, the immobilized whole cells incubated with riboflavin were employed for repeated hydrogen production in the medium containing glucose and peptone. The hydrogen productivity of the immobilized cells increased markedly after repeated use, and the immobilized cells produced hydrogen in stoichiometric amounts from glucose.

Keywords

Hydrogen Glucose Agar Lactate Growing Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isao Karube
    • 1
  • Naoto Urano
    • 1
  • Tadashi Matsunaga
    • 1
  • Shuichi Suzuki
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Laboratory of Resources UtilizationTokyo Institute of TechnologyYokohamaJapan

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