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Relevance of computer science to linguistics and vice versa

  • J. A. Moyne
Article
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Abstract

The relationship and interpenetration of computer science and linguistics are discussed. The affinity between modern linguistics and computer science is traced back to their beginnings, and related developments in the two fields are outlined. It is concluded that an interdisciplinary, or closely related, program of study in the two fields would be highly beneficial to both disciplines.

Key words

Grammar language theory linguistics computational linguistics computer science analysis and synthesis phonology morphology syntax semantics 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Moyne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science, Queens CollegeThe City University of New YorkNew York

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