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The Histochemical Journal

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 17–27 | Cite as

The ultrastructural demonstration of compounds containing 1,2-glycol groups in plant cell walls

  • G. G. Jewell
  • C. A. Saxton
Papers

Synopsis

Neutral polysaccharides have been demonstrated within thin sections of cauliflower parenchyma cell walls using the following techniques: periodic acid-Schiff-phosphotungstic acid, periodic acid-silver methenamine, periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazidesilver protein, and periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium tetroxide. The use of a specific extraction technique employing ammonium oxalate and sodium hydroxide, followed by the histochemical staining procedures, indicates that the reactive site observed comprises the hemicellulose fraction of the wall which surrounds non-staining cellulose microfibrils.

Keywords

Cellulose Cell Wall Polysaccharide Oxalate Sodium Hydroxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall Ltd 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. G. Jewell
    • 1
  • C. A. Saxton
    • 1
  1. 1.British Food Manufacturing Industries Research AssociationLeatherheadUK

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