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The Histochemical Journal

, Volume 20, Issue 6–7, pp 397–404 | Cite as

Brain enzyme histochemistry following stabilization by microwave irradiation

  • E. Marani
  • P. Bolhuis
  • M. E. Boon
Papers

Summary

The activities of various enzymes present in brain homogenates were assayed biochemically (a) with no pretreatment, (b) following a standard microwave treatment in saline and (c) after a standard microwave treatment in formalin. All enzyme activity was lost after the microwave — formalin in treatment. Following microwave — saline treatment, the activities of alkaline phosphatase, 5′-nucleotidase, isocitrate and succinate dehydrogenases were reduced. In contrast, the activities of lactate and malate dehydrogenases were unchanged, and that of acetylcholinesterase apparently increased.

Analogous outcomes were seen following attempted histochemical demonstrations of these enzymes. Thus satisfactory histochemical demonstration of all enzymes was achieved (except with alkaline phosphatase, lactate and malate dehydrogenases) following the microwave-saline pretreatment. Since acid phosphatase, catalase and peroxidase were also successfully demonstrated, it seems that microwave-saline pretreatments permit both retention of sufficient enzyme activity for histochemical demonstration to occur and retention of sufficient structural integrity for critical morphological investigations. Since the failure to stain the sites of lactate and malate dehydrogenases is not due to microwave inactivation of these enzymes, their demonstration may be possible by varying the staining procedures.

Keywords

Lactate Alkaline Phosphatase Catalase Succinate Acid Phosphatase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall Ltd 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Marani
    • 1
  • P. Bolhuis
    • 2
  • M. E. Boon
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory for Anatomy and Embryology, Neuroregulation GroupUniversity of LeidenLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Leiden Cytology and Pathology LaboratoryLeidenThe Netherlands

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