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Astrophysics

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 216–224 | Cite as

Results of spectral observations of CH Cygni for 1967–1969

  • G. N. Dzhimsheleishvili
Article
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Conclusions

Our observations permit certain conclusions concerning the changes that occurred in the spectrum of CH Cyg during the observation period. It was found that, in conformity with the results of [14], the relative monochromatic brightness and continuous radiation in the violet vary in general as a function of the variation of emission in Hβ (Figs. 6 and 5; the graph of the variation of emission in Hβ is given only in Fig. 6). But continuous radiation in the violet decreases slowly with fluctuations and does not disappear with the end of the outburst. The curves of the relative monochromatic brightness in different light change differently (Fig. 6).

As regards the excesses of continuous radiation in red, green, and blue (Figs. 3–5), we attributed their presence in the spectrum partially to the effect of the red component of CH Cyg. This follows from the fact that these excesses were observed before the outburst, and during the outburst the green and blue excesses decreased in general. In addition, the red excess does not duplicate exactly the variations of hydrogen emission. This is also noted in [16], where it is shown that the variation in V is greater than in r, whereas the contribution of the Balmer and Paschen hydrogen emission to V is less than to r. Therefore, part of the red and violet excesses should be attributed to the effect of the red component.

Keywords

Hydrogen Radiation Continuous Radiation Light Change Spectral Observation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. N. Dzhimsheleishvili

There are no affiliations available

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