EMG and EEG biofeedback training in the treatment of a 10-year-old hyperactive boy with a developmental reading disorder

Abstract

The serial application of electromyographic (EMG) and sensorimotor (SMR) biofeedback training was attempted with a 10-year-old boy presenting a triad of symptoms: an attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity, developmental reading disorder, and ocular instability. Symptom elimination was achieved, for all three aspects of the triad, following the procedure of first conditioning a decrease in EMG-monitored muscle tension and then conditioning increases in the amplitude of sensorimotor rhythm over the Rolandic cortex. The learned reduction of monitored EMG levels was accompanied by a reduction in the child's motoric activity level to below that which had been achieved by past administration of Ritalin. In addition, the attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity was no longer diagnosable following the EMG biofeedback training. The learned increase in the amplitude of monitored SMR was accompanied by remediation of the developmental reading disorder and the ocular instability. These results remained unchanged, as ascertained by follow-ups conducted over a 24-month period subsequent to the termination of biofeedback training.

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Correspondence to Dr. Michael A. Tansey.

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Tansey, M.A., Bruner, R.L. EMG and EEG biofeedback training in the treatment of a 10-year-old hyperactive boy with a developmental reading disorder. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation 8, 25–37 (1983). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01000534

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Keywords

  • Ritalin
  • Muscle Tension
  • Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Biofeedback Training
  • Serial Application