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Biofeedback and Self-regulation

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 125–132 | Cite as

Relaxation training as a treatment for irritable bowel syndrome

  • Edward B. Blanchard
  • Barbara Greene
  • Lisa Scharff
  • Shirley P. Schwarz-McMorris
Original Articles

Abstract

Although there have been many successful, controlled demonstrations of the clinical efficacy of multicomponent treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), in the present study we sought to evaluate a single component of many of these regimens, relaxation training. Eight IBS patients received a 10-session (over 8 weeks) regimen of abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation with regular home practice while 8 comparable patients merely monitored GI symptoms. Based on daily GI symptom diaries collected for 4 weeks before and 4 weeks after treatment (or continued symptom monitoring), the Relaxation condition showed significantly (p=.05) more improvement on a composite measure of primary GI symptom reduction than the Symptom Monitoring condition. Fifty percent of the Relaxation group were clinically improved at the end of treatment.

Descriptor Key Words

IBS irritable bowel syndrome GI symptoms relaxation training 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward B. Blanchard
    • 1
  • Barbara Greene
    • 1
  • Lisa Scharff
    • 1
  • Shirley P. Schwarz-McMorris
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Stress and Anxiety DisordersUniversity at Albany—SUNYUSA

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