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Open Economies Review

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 67–81 | Cite as

Protectionism in Japan

  • Marcus Noland
Review Essay

Key words

commercial policy protectionism 

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcus Noland
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for International EconomicsWashington, D.C.
  2. 2.Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreU.S.A.

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