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Marketing Letters

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 413–426 | Cite as

Understanding managers' strategic decision-making process

  • William Boulding
  • Marian Chapman Moore
  • Richard Staelin
  • Kim P. Corfman
  • Peter Reid Dickson
  • Gavan Fitzsimons
  • Sunil Gupta
  • Donald R. Lehmann
  • Deborah J. Mitchell
  • Joel E. Urbany
  • Barton A. Weitz
Article

Abstract

This goal of this paper is to establish a research agenda that will lead to a stream of research that closes the gap between actual and normative strategic managerial decision making. We start by distinguishing strategic managerial decision making (choices) from other choices. Next, we propose a conceptual model of how managers make strategic decisions that is consistent with the observed gap between actual and normative decision making. This framework suggests a series of interesting issues, both descriptive and prescriptive in nature, about the strategic decision-making process that define our proposed research agenda.

Key words

strategic choices managerial decision making decision errors mental models 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Boulding
    • 1
  • Marian Chapman Moore
  • Richard Staelin
  • Kim P. Corfman
  • Peter Reid Dickson
  • Gavan Fitzsimons
  • Sunil Gupta
  • Donald R. Lehmann
  • Deborah J. Mitchell
  • Joel E. Urbany
  • Barton A. Weitz
  1. 1.Fuqua School of BusinessDuke UniversityDurham

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