Biofeedback and Self-regulation

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 51–56 | Cite as

Incentives to enhance the effects of electromyographic Feedback Training in stroke patients

  • Jeffrey L. Santee
  • Michael E. Keister
  • Kenneth M. Kleinman
Articles

Abstract

The use of monetary incentives to enhance the effects of electromyographic(EMG) feedback training was studied in five stabilized stroke patients with hemiplegia. The study was divided into Baseline, EMG Feedback Training, Feedback Training Plus Incentives, and Follow-Up treatment conditions. Integrated EMG activity was recorded simultaneously from the anterior tibialis and medial gastrocnemius muscles during relaxation and dorsiflexion of the affected foot. Patients were instructed to try to increase anterior tibialis EMG activity while decreasing EMG activity in the medial gastrocnemius. Range of motion was measured both prior to and immediately following the Baseline and Feedback Training conditions. Results suggested that(a) EMG feedback training produced greater EMG control and range of motion than did unassisted practice, and(b) the addition of monetary incentives may enhance the effects of feedback training, possibly through its effect on patient motivation.

Keywords

Stroke Patient Training Condition Gastrocnemius Muscle Hemiplegia Medial Gastrocnemius 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey L. Santee
    • 1
  • Michael E. Keister
    • 1
  • Kenneth M. Kleinman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySouthern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville

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