Biofeedback and Self-regulation

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 325–337 | Cite as

Versatility in computer automation for biofeedback: The Behavioral Assessment and Rehabilitative Training System (BARTS)

  • George K. Montgomery
  • Eric W. Howland
  • Charles S. Cleeland
  • William C. Mueller
  • Michael P. Dearing
Article
  • 20 Downloads

Abstract

User versatility in a system for computer-automated biofeedback training is the degree to which the assessment and training parameters may be altered by the user's employing English language or other simple code, that is, without altering the system's applications software. The Behavioral Assessment and Rehabilitative Training System (BARTS) includes a design and control program that allows for the specification of assessment and training protocols by persons who are entirely lacking in computer programming skills. This paper describes the logic for data acquisition and training that is incorporated in the BARTS, describes the parameters that must be specified in constituting unique assessment or training protocols, and illustrates the system's application in a research-oriented biofeedback clinic.

Descriptor Key Words

computer automation physiological assessment biofeedback 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • George K. Montgomery
    • 1
  • Eric W. Howland
    • 1
  • Charles S. Cleeland
    • 1
  • William C. Mueller
    • 1
  • Michael P. Dearing
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Wisconsin-MadisonUSA

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