Biofeedback, relaxation training, and music: Homeostasis for coping with stress

Abstract

This study compared the efficacy of five relaxation training procedures, four of which employed EMG auditory feedback: (1) biofeedback only (BF), (2) autogenic training phrases (ATP), (3) music (MU), (4) autogenic training phrases and music (ATP & MU), and (5) a control group, in developing self-regulation of a “cultivated low arousal state” as a countermeasure to tensed muscular reaction to stressful imagery. Twenty subjects established a pre- and posttraining frontalis region EMG biofeedback baseline measurement. Sixteen subjects were assigned at random to the 25-minute taped relaxation training procedure. After eight training sessions (4 weeks), MU and ATP & MU groups achieved highly significant differences when compared with the control group. The ATP & MU group attained the lowest postbaseline arousal level measured by the EMG. EMG as a physiological measure for transfer of training functioned well in detecting the psychophysiological affect of stressful imagery.

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Correspondence to Scottie Blake Reynolds.

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This report is based on a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Arts in Psychology degree by the author. The author extends his gratitude to Dr. Theodore Steiner, Dr. Paul Eskildsen, and Dr. Frank Hovell, who served on the committee, and to Rosemary Kolentus, for her help with this article.

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Reynolds, S.B. Biofeedback, relaxation training, and music: Homeostasis for coping with stress. Biofeedback and Self-Regulation 9, 169–179 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00998832

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Descriptor Key Words

  • EMG biofeedback
  • autogenic training phrases
  • music