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Biofeedback and Self-regulation

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 103–112 | Cite as

Ongoing assessment

Experience of a university biofeedback clinic
  • Lilian Rosenbaum
  • Philip S. Greco
  • Charles Sternberg
  • Gary L. Singleton
Case Studies And Clinic Management

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to assess the Georgetown University Family Center Biofeedback Clinic in its first 2 years of operation. The clinic used Budzynski's and Stoyva's training routines as well as family systems theory. Details of the treatment methods and the patients seen are described, along with an ongoing procedure developed to assess results. Preliminary results on 93 patients show that 80% report symptom improvement. Self-report of improvement is associated with decreases in frontal EMG levels and with changes in life-style.

Keywords

Health Psychology System Theory Treatment Method Symptom Improvement Family System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lilian Rosenbaum
    • 1
  • Philip S. Greco
    • 1
  • Charles Sternberg
    • 1
  • Gary L. Singleton
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgetown University Medical CenterUSA

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