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Biofeedback and Self-regulation

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 113–120 | Cite as

Electromyographic biofeedback for relief of tension in the facial and throat muscles of a woodwind musician

  • John R. Levee
  • Michael J. Cohen
  • William H. Rickles
Case Reports And Training Techniques

Abstract

Electromyographic(EMG) biofeedback, for the relaxation of specific throat and facial muscles, was given to a woodwind musician. The patient had a nineteen-year history of tics and high levels of tension in his throat and facial muscles. Eventually these problems progressed to a point that interfered with his ability to perform as a professional woodwind musician. Following detoxification from alcohol and Dexamyl, and after a period of psychotherapy, EMG biofeedback relaxation training was started for the muscles specifically showing chronically high tension levels. The EMG training consisted of four phases designed to help the patient progressively lower tension and generalize these newly learned techniques to his professional life. He had a total of twenty treatments of approximately 45 minutes each. This procedure resulted in dramatic reductions in tension levels of the specific throat and facial muscles along with increased proficiency as a muscician and in psychological functioning.

Keywords

Alcohol Health Psychology High Tension Dramatic Reduction Psychological Functioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Levee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael J. Cohen
    • 1
    • 2
  • William H. Rickles
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Psychological ServicesVeterans Administration HospitalSepulveda
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUCLA School of MedicineUSA

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