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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 403–418 | Cite as

Female sex pheromone of oriental tobacco budworm,Helicoverpa assulta (Guenee) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): Identification and field testing

  • A. Cork
  • K. S. Boo
  • E. Dunkelblum
  • D. R. Hall
  • K. Jee-Rajunga
  • M. Kehat
  • E. Kong JIE
  • K. C. Park
  • P. Tepgidagarn
  • Liu Xun
Article

Abstract

Analysis of ovipositor washings from virgin femaleHelicoverpa assulta (Guenée) (Lepidoptere: Noctuidae) from Korea by gas chromatography (GC) linked to electroantennography and GC linked to mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of nine compounds, hexadecanal, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, (Z)-11-hexadecenal, hexadecyl acetate, (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate, (Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate, hexadecan-l-ol, (Z)-9-hexadecen-l-ol, and (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol. However, ovipositor washings from females from Thailand contained mainly the 16-carbon aldehydes with very small amounts of (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate. Field tests conducted in Korea, China, and Thailand indicated that a binary blend of (Z)-9-hexadecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal was sufficient for attraction, although the most attractive ratio of compounds varied with location. In Korea a 20∶1 blend of compounds was the most attractive, while in Thailand a 7.5∶1 blend was most attractive. In China both blends of hexadecenal isomers were equally attractive. Addition of the hexadecenyl acetates to the 20∶1 blend of hexadecenals in the ratio of 1∶3.3 increased the trap catch of maleH. assulta compared to lures containing the aldehydes alone in Korea but reduced trap catch in China. Addition of the hexadecenyl acetates to the 7.5∶1 blend of hexadecenals had no significant effect on trap catch in Thailand or China compared to the aldehydes alone. The addition of the 16-carbon alcohols to the aldehydes had a significantly inhibitory effect in all three countries, suggesting they are not pheromone components. Taken together these results indicate thatH. assulta is polymorphic with at least two populations responding to different sex pheromones.

Key Words

Helicoverpa assulta Heliothis Lepidoptera Noctuidae hexadecanal (Z)-9-hexadecenal (Z)-11-hexadecenal hexadecyl acetate (Z)-9-hexadecenyl acetate (Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate hexadecan-1-ol (Z)-9-hexadecen-1-ol (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol sex pheromone 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Cork
    • 1
  • K. S. Boo
    • 2
  • E. Dunkelblum
    • 3
  • D. R. Hall
    • 1
  • K. Jee-Rajunga
    • 4
  • M. Kehat
    • 3
  • E. Kong JIE
    • 5
  • K. C. Park
    • 2
  • P. Tepgidagarn
    • 4
  • Liu Xun
    • 5
  1. 1.Natural Resources InstituteChatham Maritime ChathamUK
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural Biology College of AgricultureSeoul National UniversitySuwonRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Institute of Plant ProtectionARO The Volcani CenterBet DaganIsrael
  4. 4.Division of Entomology and Zoology Department of AgricultureBangkhen, BangkokThailand
  5. 5.Institute of ZoologyAcademia SinicaBeijingChina

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