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Marketing Letters

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 81–94 | Cite as

Choosing among diffusion models: Some empirical evidence

  • Philip M. Parker
Article

Abstract

Is there a ‘best’ diffusion model? How many and which parameters will adequately represent the long-run diffusion process? Two studies using first purchase data for nineteen durable goods are used to systematically compare twenty-four alternative diffusion models: a meta-analytic study, which pools across categories, and an economic approach, which determines the best fitting model for each category individually. A number of guidelines are produced, which stand to improve the choice of diffusion models in forecasting, theory testing, and normative studies.

Key words

Diffusion Models New Product Forecasting Innovation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip M. Parker
    • 1
  1. 1.INSEADFontainebleauFrance

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