Neurochemical Research

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 323–329 | Cite as

Effects on in vitro brain protein synthesis of a translational inhibitor isolated from rabbit brain following intravenous administration of LSD

  • Scott W. Fleming
  • Ian R. Brown
Original Articles

Abstract

Inhibition of brain protein synthesis following intravenous administration of d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is accompanied by generation of a translational inhibitor protein in the postribosomal supernatant of cerebral hemispheres. Addition of an enriched preparation of this factor to a brain cell-free translation system resulted in a selective reduction in the level of phosphorylation of proteins of molecular weight 55K, 41K, and 25K. A similar set of changes was also observed in a brain cell-free system prepared 1 hr subsequent to drug injection. The brain inhibitor reduced the translational capacity of a messenger RNA-dependent reticulocyte lysate programmed with brain polysomes isolated from saline-injected animals however little effect was apparent when polysomes were prepared from LSD-treated animals. The translational inhibitor did not affect the spectrum of translation products from either set of polysomes.

Key Words

Translational inhibitor LSD heat shock protein 

Abbreviations used

HRI

heme-regulated inhibitor

K

1000 Molecular weight

LSD

d-lysergic acid diethylamide

PMS

postmitochondrial supernatant

TCA

trichloroacetic acid

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott W. Fleming
    • 1
  • Ian R. Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of Toronto Scarborough CampusWest HillCanada

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